Home  |  Reviews  |  Vlogs  |  Interviews  |  Guest Posts  |  Fairy Tales  |  Jane Austen  |  Memes  |  Policies

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

GIVEAWAY & Guest Post from Amy D'Orazio, author of A Lady's Reputation

Please join me in welcoming Amy D'Orazio to Austen in August! This is Amy's first post here, and I'm always happy to expand our group (flock? clutch? murder?) of Janeites! Amy has stopped by today to talk about Regency ladies amusements (or lack thereof), and how that played into her most recent release. She's also giving you an opportunity to win one of her books, so make sure to click through and enter! And leave her some love in the comments, to welcome her to AIA!


One thing that always strikes me when I read Jane Austen’s works is how limited the opportunities for amusement really were. After all, our world is one of constant amusement— we can travel nearly anywhere, watch almost anything, read millions of books, play a game with someone we’ve never met. Endless possibilities! Compare that to a young woman living in rural England in 1811 and you have… a walk. Talking to you mother, sisters, or close neighbors. Reading one of the three books your father bought this year. Maybe another walk? No wonder gossip ran rampant! It was fun! It’s always a challenge to those of us who love to write Austenesque fiction: what should we have our characters do? Where can they go, and what will they do when they get there?

In my recent release, A Lady’s Reputation, most of the action takes place at Pemberley, and that decision came about because of an article I read on the renovations to Chatsworth. I saw the pictures and immediately thought that I wanted to have Darcy and Elizabeth have a picnic on the roof at Pemberley.

Chatsworth Roof One.jpg


Darcy pulled Elizabeth to her feet, leading her a bit farther across the roof to enjoy the view he so wanted her to see. The crescent moon lent an almost spectral quality to his land, which was unfurled beneath her like an enchanted map. The stream wound its way prettily through the fields and around the park, and the farms that dotted the landscape at regular intervals looked neat and charming. Darcy pointed out various landmarks: the town of Lambton, the river, and the trout pond. A sense of awe stole over her, thinking of the responsibility he bore for all she saw. It is a magical kingdom, and it is his kingdom. It filled her with still greater wonder to consider he had wished to share it with her. He was master of all she surveyed and wanted her to be its mistress, to join with him in the care of this land and these people.
It’s a mushy scene for sure but also a pivotal one because it’s the point at which Elizabeth finally realizes she’s in love with him. (Also the scene of their (spoiler alert) first kiss!

When I posted the original version of this story, one of the conversations which arose was imagining what exactly they might have seen as they looked at the sky. Not being any sort of astronomer, I made a few completely incorrect guesses…fortunately I had one sharp reader, Steve, who came to my rescue and showed me an extremely cool web site where you can see exactly what the night sky would have looked like on any certain date… including July 1812!

Hopefully I am not the only one who finds it sort of cool to imagine the scene D&E had — but hey, if you’re not there for the astronomy, come for the mush! Darcy’s cousins surely found it enticing…
“I am exceedingly disappointed that I have never considered the roof myself,” Saye interjected. “I can only imagine how delightful it must be to feel the fresh air on your—”“Stay off my roof, Saye.”“What? Darcy, that is ungenerous.”“You have your own roof.”“Matlock House? A dreadful pitched thing. What woman wants to be amorous when she fears she might slide off a roof to her death?”
Chatsworth Roof Two.jpg

A Lady’s Reputation released in July 2019
“Mr. Darcy, I am eager to hear your explanation for the fact that quite a few people believe we are engaged.”

It starts with a bit of well-meant advice. Colonel Fitzwilliam suggests to his cousin Darcy that, before he proposes to Elizabeth Bennet in Kent, perhaps he ought to discuss his plans with their families first.
pasted-image.tiff
What neither man could have predicted however was that Lord Matlock would write the news to his sister, or that Viscount Saye would overhear and tell his friends, or that his friends might slip a little and let their friends know as well. The news spreads just as quickly through Hertfordshire once Mrs Bennet opens the express Mr Bennet receives from Mr Darcy, and in a matter of days, it seems like everyone knows that Mr Darcy has proposed marriage to Elizabeth Bennet.
Everyone, that is, except Elizabeth herself.
Her refusal is quick and definite—until matters of reputation, hers as well as Jane’s, are considered. Then Mr Darcy makes another offer: summer at Pemberley so that Jane can be reunited with Mr Bingley and so that he can prove to Elizabeth he is not what she thinks of him. Falling in love with him is naturally impossible…but once she knows the man he truly is, will she be able to help herself?

****GIVEAWAY****
Amy has offered up a book of choice of one of her books, (A Lady’s Reputation, the Best Part of Love, or A Short Period of Exquisite Felicity) to one lucky Austen in August reader!
If the winner is US, they'll receive a signed paperback; international winners will receive an ebook
To enter, fill out the Rafflecopter below.
Full terms located in the Rafflecopter.
Ends September 5th, 2019 at 11:59pm EST
Good luck!

a Rafflecopter giveaway



Jane Austen, Austen in August, blog event, Jane Austen fan fiction, JAFF, The Book Rat, BookRatMisty
Click here to return to the master list of Austen in August posts!

33 comments:

  1. The roof at Chatsworth looks perfect for that scene (even though I always picture Pemberley as Lyme Park!) Love this story!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am with you Gail! But it was fun to see that nice flat roof!

      Delete
  2. We definitely live in a world of instant gratification. There is something to be said for simpler times.

    ReplyDelete
  3. My first “date” with MrB was watching a meteor shower, sitting on a dock on the Chesapeake Bay. So scenes like that I am overly sentimental about. Love.

    ReplyDelete
  4. What a fun idea for a story. I love the idea of a picnic on the roof -- lovely, balmy breezes, few insects to annoy, and, of course stunning views, stunning, luscious food from the Pemberley kitchens and even more luscious Mr. Darcy.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hmmmm, I commented and it doesn't show up. The comment was about the brilliance of the idea and the joys of a rooff picnic with Darcy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad it showed up! And yes, lets assume the bugs kept their distance haha!

      Delete
  6. The night tryst on the rooftop is a lovely idea. Chatsworth looks impressive, although my imaginary idea of Pemberley is on a slightly smaller scale.Thanks for the giveaway!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes I agree...Chatsworth is not necessarily my Pemberley, it just has a good roof structure for a moonlight tryst!

      Delete
  7. Wow, love the idea of a picnic up there! Thank you for the giveaway!

    ReplyDelete
  8. John Karlsson (aka John Rieber)August 27, 2019 at 3:08 PM

    I always love it when Darcy's OTHER relatives (other than Lady Catherine, that is) get involved. Any freebie from Amy D'Orazio is worth its weight in bitcoins!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Wow, what a great idea to describe actual weather on a day the scene takes place. i'm impressed. Great scene.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sure sign of a disturbed mind LOL... fun fact, the Gentleman's Magazine back then published the monthly weather and moon cycles. Why, who knows, but its useful now to those of us who want to know if there really was rain on August 4 1812 haha!

      Delete
  10. I know Lizzy have loved this romantic and breath-taking view. No wonder she was enamored by Mr Darcy (joke).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha! That and a few other things, right? LOL. Thank you!

      Delete
  11. Thank you for this chance in this giveaway. Love actually seeing the star map for that date. Picnics on the rooftop are so romantic. Being with nature with a warm blanket, a warm person and food is perfect.sigh!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Being on the roof together is a great romantic scene. I love the premise as it sounds like the best game of telephone ever.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Aw how romantic! I wish someone tried to woo me with a picnic in a roof showing me the stars and magnificent view!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Fantastic post. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I love that you were able to find out what the night sky might have looked like in July 1812. I'm always amazed by what info I can find online. (Whether it's all true, I can't say, but I do love that there are people out there so fascinated by the past that they research and then share their findings online!) Definitely looking forward to reading your book, and congrats again on the release.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Sometimes I feel we are spoiled with all the electronics and entertainment we have today compared to Regency times.

    ReplyDelete
  17. How romantic! Love that you can look up the night sky for any date, might go check that out now!!! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  18. :::sigh::: A picnic on the roof under the stars with Mr. Darcy? What could be more romantic?

    ReplyDelete
  19. Wow, it surely is a romantic scene, Amy. I didn't know that such a website exist that can show you how the sky looks like on specific days in the past. That's the wonders of internet and why I love to browse it for knowledge!

    ReplyDelete

Tell me all your thoughts.
Let's be best friends.

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...