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Monday, November 11, 2019

There's Something About Darcy by Gabrielle Malcolm | blog tour



Today I'm hopping into the There's Something About Darcy blog tour with a quick, poorly-shot video of my thoughts on this non-fic examination of everyone's favorite rude, socially awkward, condescending, rich, gorgeous, dynamic romantic lead: Fitzwilliam M.* Darcy.

I'd love to hear in the comments which fictional character you'd like to see get the book-length analytical treatment! But for now, There's Something About Darcy is available today!

*Motherfluffing.






ABOUT THE BOOK:
There's Something About Darcy
by Gabrielle Malcolm
For some, Colin Firth emerging from a lake in that clinging wet shirt is one of the most iconic moments in television. But what is it about the two-hundred-year-old hero that we so ardently admire and love?

Dr Gabrielle Malcolm examines Jane Austen’s influences in creating Darcy’s potent mix of brooding Gothic hero, aristocratic elitist and romantic Regency man of action. She investigates how he paved the way for later characters like Heathcliff, Rochester and even Dracula, and what his impact has been on popular culture over the past two centuries. For twenty-first century readers the world over have their idea of the ‘perfect’ Darcy in mind when they read the novel, and will defend their choice passionately.

In this insightful and entertaining study, every variety of Darcy jostles for attention: vampire Darcy, digital Darcy, Mormon Darcy and gay Darcy. Who does it best and how did a clergyman’s daughter from Hampshire create such an enduring character?

A must-read for every Darcy and Jane Austen fan.


Dr. Gabrielle Malcolm lectures and writes about Jane Austen in popular culture and the global fan phenomena surrounding Austen’s work. She is the author of Fan Phenomena: Jane Austen and is a regular speaker at the annual Jane Austen Festival in Bath, and the Jane Austen Regency Week in Chawton. She lives in Bath.




Friday, November 8, 2019

Black Canary: Ignite by Meg Cabot | Blog Tour

Review copy provided by the publisher.
Affiliate links used in this post.



I want to start by saying, I'm really loving the trend of popular YA authors taking on well-known and -loved comic book characters for reboots, prequels and the like. I think they bring a freshness to the series', along with a honed talent (generally) for piecing a story together and layering it with richness and subtext, without a lot of the serious, self-congratulatory heavy-handedness that we sometimes see with reboots and "reexaminations."

I -- never having been a gatekeeper of media that I love, but rather someone who actively wants to pull people in -- also think that having these authors (Kami Garcia, Danielle Paige, Lauren Myracle, et all) is a great way to attract a new young audience, who are discovering these masked heroes and vigilantes sometimes for the first time. And none (so far) is as likely to pull them in as Meg Cabot.

Black Canary: Ignite, with its relatable storyline (even in the midst of superpowers) and bright, vibrant art & coloring — from Cara McGee and Caitlin Quirk, respectively — is very likely to win over that young audience. It has an ease and youthful appeal that is almost certain to hit the mark with its target audience.

That said, I think it is a highly targeted audience. I may be in the minority on this (goodreads ratings for the book are remarkably high), but I think the story is likely to lose a bit of its shine the further a reader gets from the targeted demographic. Where younger readers will find it relatable and inviting, I think older readers may find it cloying and overly simplistic. It was a little too light on story (and impact), and a little too heavy on... handedness for my tastes, and while it was cute, it was equal-measures cheesy. It would have benefited from a slower buildup into Black Canary status, Big Bad Villain reveal, and the all-around getting-to-know-you phase of the characters and their motivations/interactions. A little too much was crammed in and rushed through to get us to the origin of this origin story.

But the messaging is strong and the tone welcoming, and as I said, I think it will most certainly find its target audience.
I just may be a bit too far off the bullseye for this one.



Black Canary: Ignite by Meg Cabot (Author), Cara McGee (Illustrator, Artist)
From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Princess Diariescomes Black Canary: Ignite, Meg Cabot's first graphic novel! With expressive and energetic art by Cara McGee to match the trademark attitude and spunk of Meg Cabot's characters and dialogue, this mother-daughter story embraces the highs and lows of growing up without growing out of what makes us unique.

Thirteen-year-old Dinah Lance knows exactly what she wants, who she is, and where she's going. First, she'll win the battle of the bands with her two best friends, then she'll join the Gotham City Junior Police Academy so she can solve crimes just like her dad. Who knows, her rock star group of friends may even save the world, but first they'll need to agree on a band name.

When a mysterious figure keeps getting in the way of Dinah's goals and threatens her friends and family, she'll learn more about herself, her mother's secret past, and navigating the various power chords of life.

Black Canary: Ignite is an inspirational song that encourages readers to find their own special voices to sing along with Black Canary!


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